The Internet is positively riddled with traffic generators. They range from low-quality autorefresh bots using proxies to appear as though they come from around the world, to sophisticated traffic exchange systems powered by real people and real advertising. Ideally, you’ll strike upon the most valuable of these networks when you’re searching, but there’s a few problems.
It’s not enough to produce great content and hope that people find it – you have to be proactive. One of the best ways to increase traffic to your website is to use social media channels to promote your content. Twitter is ideal for short, snappy (and tempting) links, whereas Google+ promotion can help your site show up in personalized search results and seems especially effective in B2B niches. If you’re a B2C product company, you might find great traction with image-heavy social sites like Pinterest and Instagram. Here's more advice on making the most of social media marketing.
As the name implies, 1MC is a program that allows you to rack up a sizable number of clicks to your website in a very short time. It advertises itself as a “fake traffic generator” and that’s really what it is; it’s not going to earn you any money through commissions or referrals. It may earn you cash through pay per view ads, particularly if you use a proxy list, but its primary purpose is typically for testing. If you want to make sure your analytics are accurately reporting clicks, you can schedule a number of clicks through the software and track them. You can also set it to freely spam a site with clicks, to test the server under load. You should, of course, avoid targeting competitors; they won’t take kindly to an unwanted server stress test.
To find the right people I downloaded a list of some of the most popular users within the community. To do this, I used Screaming Frog SEO Spider to gather a list of all the URLs on the website. I then exported this list into an Excel spreadsheet and filtered the URLs to only show those that were user profile pages. I could do this because all of the profile pages had /user/ within the URL.
For example, in Facebook, you can target specific groups or user pages that are cohesive with your keywords. You can then promote your website products or blog posts to that audience. In Twitter, you can search by hashtag for some of the keywords you write about. You can then reply or do a mention to that audience and see how your products or blog post can help them solve their problem.
Once you've set up an alert within Mention, go to your settings and then 'Manage Notifications'. From here you can select the option to get a daily digest email of any mentions (I'd recommend doing this). You also have the option of getting desktop alerts - I personally find them annoying, but if you really want to stay on the ball then they could be a good idea.
The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"): 
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