Basically, what I’m talking about here is finding websites that have mentioned your brand name but they haven’t actually linked to you. For example, someone may have mentioned my name in an article they wrote (“Matthew Barby did this…”) but they didn’t link to matthewbarby.com. By checking for websites like this you can find quick opportunities to get them to add a link.
This one is so obvious, we’re going to look at it first. Paid search, social media advertising and display advertising (try our Smart Ads Creator!) are all excellent ways of attracting visitors, building your brand and getting your site in front of people. Adjust your paid strategies to suit your goals – do you just want more traffic, or are you looking to increase conversions, too? Each paid channel has its pros and cons, so think carefully about your objectives before you reach for your credit card.
Buffer App: This is a free app that you connect to your social media accounts. You can upgrade to a Pro account that gives you more features. You can configure the dates & times you need to post. Once your accounts are connected, you can select what you want to share on social media and click on Buffer. It’ll ask you which accounts you want to post to and you can customize the “message” you want to promote, by adding hashtags, images and a brief description. You can also install a Chrome extension that allows you to instantly “Buffer” any website post you’re on.

Open the app to to enter the number of visits, the interval between visits, and if you'd like to see pages displayed. The program's default sites to check file includes a few sites from the well-known Yahoo and MSN to an unfamiliar site we won't name in this review. Changing the list didn't change the fact the application directed traffic to the unfamiliar site more often than sites listed. Testers concluded the app masks the fact that every installation will direct traffic to that unfamiliar site.


Alas, there is no quick solution, especially when no one actually knows how Google’s search engine algorithm actually works. The strategies highlighted within this post are some of the better known strategies that improve your ranking chances. And, remember, whatever strategies you use will take time. Don’t expect a sudden increase in traffic if you tweak your SEO.


So, how can you increase your chances of appearing on the first page of the search results? This blog post discusses the best 7 strategies to increase your organic search traffic. The strategies discussed below all relate to some form of Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO is a strategy that you can use to increase the chances of your site being found in the search results.
This is a simple but time-consuming process and an example of off-site SEO. Once you have written the type of content that makes you proud, and you publish it, it’s not going to get read by itself. You need to spend a lot of energy in promoting it. Fortunately, there are some tools that help you automate some of these tasks, but you still need to put in some time into it.
This one is so obvious, we’re going to look at it first. Paid search, social media advertising and display advertising (try our Smart Ads Creator!) are all excellent ways of attracting visitors, building your brand and getting your site in front of people. Adjust your paid strategies to suit your goals – do you just want more traffic, or are you looking to increase conversions, too? Each paid channel has its pros and cons, so think carefully about your objectives before you reach for your credit card.
Also consider forums where people hang out and discuss various subjects. Asking and answering questions is a great way to increase your own knowledge as well as sharing the knowledge you already have. Being active in these forums (Quora for example) is another way to get good exposure. Remember though, no Spamming, or your time there will be short.
Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.
Everyone wants to rank for those broad two or three word key phrases because they tend to have high search volumes. The problem with these broad key phrases is they are highly competitive. So competitive that you may not stand a chance of ranking for them unless you devote months of your time to it. Instead of spending your time going after something that may not even be attainable, go after the low-hanging fruit of long-tail key phrases.
You’re not limited to promoting your website or blog posts on Social Media. You can do this with other blogs, especially in your niche. You can reach out to bloggers in the same niche and write a guest post on their blog. If their audience reads and likes your blog post, they may come to your blog to read more of your content. By being able to post your blog post links on other websites, you are effectively practicing the art of “backlinking”. Backlinking is a strategy that increases your website ranking on the search engine results.

Use long tail keywords. Don’t just go with the most popular keywords in your market. Use keywords that are more specific to your product or service. In time, Google and other search engines will identify your website or blog as a destination for that particular subject, which will boost your content in search rankings and help your ideal customers find you. These tools will help.


First, you need to know what content is old. If you have a content inventory, this should be simple. If you don’t, you can use Screaming Frog (free up to 500 URLs) to scrape your blog content and publication dates. Or, if you’re more of a manual person, go into Google Analytics and see which blogs are driving traffic and check when you published them. Tedious, but effective.
To do this, I often align the launch of my content with a couple of guest posts on relevant websites to drive a load of relevant traffic to it, as well as some relevant links. This has a knock-on effect toward the organic amplification of the content and means that you at least have something to show for the content (in terms of ROI) if it doesn't do as well as you expect organically.
It’s not enough to just share content through social channels – you need to actively participate in the community, too. Got a Twitter account? Then join in group discussions with relevant hashtags. Is your audience leaving comments on your Facebook posts? Answer questions and engage with your readers. Nothing turns people off quicker than using social media as a broadcast channel – use social media as it was intended and actually interact with your fans.
If both page are closely related (lots of topical overlap), I would merge the unique content from the lower ranking article into the top ranking one, then 301 redirect the lower performing article into the top ranking one. This will make the canonical version more relevant, and give it an immediate authority boost. I would also fetch it right away, do some link building, and possibly a little paid promotion to seed some engagement. Update the time stamp.
Traffic data is a great way to take the temperature of your website and marketing initiatives. When you are writing and promoting blog content on a regular basis, you can use traffic data to track results and correlate these efforts to actual ROI. Be sure to look at traffic numbers over long-term intervals to see trends and report on improvement over time.  
The Featured Snippet section appearing inside the first page of Google is an incredibly important section to have your content placed within. I did a study of over 5,000 keywords where HubSpot.com ranked on page 1 and there was a Featured Snippet being displayed. What I found was that when HubSpot.com was ranking in the Featured Snippet, the average click-through rate to the website increased by over 114%.
What I’m getting at is using Google’s related searches to your advantage. Google related search queries are exactly what they sound like—searches that Google has algorithmically associated with certain groups of keywords. So, if you find a keyword that has high volume, is relevant to your target audience and business goals, and has relatively low competition, your job isn’t done. Instead, make sure that you’re taking note of related searches to ensure your content is in-depth and fully addresses the topic.
Analysis – Using our newly built algorithm we got to testing, creating websites to test content patterns and architecture. We were quick to declare defeat within verticals without traction, and paid close attention to where the traffic was growing the most. The algorithm started to take shape and after roughly 3 months was able to identify within an order of magnitude the amount of traffic we could acquire for a given set of costs.
Tailwind: This is an automatic scheduler designed mainly for Pinterest, and now also available for Instagram and Facebook. It operates on the same principles as Buffer and is a must if you use Pinterest extensively. It also has a Chrome extension. Tailwind has a 30 day trial and then is $15/month or $9.99/month if you pay annually. There are more plans to upgrade to if you need to.
So, how can you increase your chances of appearing on the first page of the search results? This blog post discusses the best 7 strategies to increase your organic search traffic. The strategies discussed below all relate to some form of Search Engine Optimization (SEO). SEO is a strategy that you can use to increase the chances of your site being found in the search results.
There is no magic formula for content marketing success, despite what some would have you believe. For this reason, vary the length and format of your content to make it as appealing as possible to different kinds of readers. Intersperse shorter, news-based blog posts with long-form content as well as video, infographics and data-driven pieces for maximum impact.
The days when internet browsing was done exclusively on desktop PCs are long gone. Today, more people than ever before are using mobile devices to access the web, and if you force your visitors to pinch and scroll their way around your site, you’re basically telling them to go elsewhere. Ensure that your website is accessible and comfortably viewable across a range of devices, including smaller smartphones.
Every website has to be structured in a way to make it easy for your audience to find what they’re looking for. There are several elements residing on your site that help in optimizing for SEO. The content that you write that you’re most proud of serves as your “cornerstone” content. Think of a mall and the one or two department stores that are called Anchor Stores. They are the reason people come to the mall. Your cornerstone content should play that role. They should be the main reason for people to come to this website.
I’ve always been a believer that hard work gets the best results, and in practice it always ends up being true. On the web it’s no different. If you want more organic traffic, you have to work for it. That means giving your best effort every time, going after opportunities your competitors have missed, being consistent, guest blogging strategically, and staying on Google’s good side.
The strength of your link profile isn’t solely determined by how many sites link back to you – it can also be affected by your internal linking structure. When creating and publishing content, be sure to keep an eye out for opportunities for internal links. This not only helps with SEO, but also results in a better, more useful experience for the user – the cornerstone of increasing traffic to your website.
When Larry wrote about the kick in the proverbial teeth that eBay took from Google’s Panda update, we managed to secure a link from Ars Technica in the Editor’s Pick section alongside links to The New York Times and National Geographic. Not too shabby – and neither was the resulting spike in referral traffic. Learn what types of links send lots of referral traffic, and how to get them, in this post.
Every website has to be structured in a way to make it easy for your audience to find what they’re looking for. There are several elements residing on your site that help in optimizing for SEO. The content that you write that you’re most proud of serves as your “cornerstone” content. Think of a mall and the one or two department stores that are called Anchor Stores. They are the reason people come to the mall. Your cornerstone content should play that role. They should be the main reason for people to come to this website.
As a new blogger or entrepreneur, one of the challenges you encounter is for your blog post or your website to “rank” well in the search results of any search engine. By ranking, I mean that whenever your potential reader or prospect searches for a product or service that you have to offer, your website comes up on the first page of the search results. The term “Organic Search” means that someone is searching for your website or post through the traditional search on the search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.). This is also known as organic ranking.

What I’m getting at is using Google’s related searches to your advantage. Google related search queries are exactly what they sound like—searches that Google has algorithmically associated with certain groups of keywords. So, if you find a keyword that has high volume, is relevant to your target audience and business goals, and has relatively low competition, your job isn’t done. Instead, make sure that you’re taking note of related searches to ensure your content is in-depth and fully addresses the topic.
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