This is a simple but time-consuming process and an example of off-site SEO. Once you have written the type of content that makes you proud, and you publish it, it’s not going to get read by itself. You need to spend a lot of energy in promoting it. Fortunately, there are some tools that help you automate some of these tasks, but you still need to put in some time into it.
As a new blogger or entrepreneur, one of the challenges you encounter is for your blog post or your website to “rank” well in the search results of any search engine. By ranking, I mean that whenever your potential reader or prospect searches for a product or service that you have to offer, your website comes up on the first page of the search results. The term “Organic Search” means that someone is searching for your website or post through the traditional search on the search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing, etc.). This is also known as organic ranking.
First things first, if your goal for content is to drive traffic to your site, then you should be treating your blog like a library, not a publication. Which means you should be creating content with highly-searched keywords (and, of course, business objectives, services, etc.) in mind. After all, no search volume, no chance you drive organic traffic.
Your keyword research will determine whether or not your search optimization effort will be a success or a failure. Many businesses make the mistake of basing their keywords on just the search volume. This often leads to attempting to rank for keywords that are very difficult and costly to move up, or even keywords that aren’t “buyer” keywords and just send useless traffic to the website.

This is a simple but time-consuming process and an example of off-site SEO. Once you have written the type of content that makes you proud, and you publish it, it’s not going to get read by itself. You need to spend a lot of energy in promoting it. Fortunately, there are some tools that help you automate some of these tasks, but you still need to put in some time into it.
I’ve always been a believer that hard work gets the best results, and in practice it always ends up being true. On the web it’s no different. If you want more organic traffic, you have to work for it. That means giving your best effort every time, going after opportunities your competitors have missed, being consistent, guest blogging strategically, and staying on Google’s good side.
Secure (https) to non-secure sites (http): Since Google began emphasizing the importance of having a secure site, more websites are securely hosted, as indicated by the “https” in their URLs. Per the security protocol, however, any traffic going from a secure site to a non-secure site will not pass referral information. For this issue, you can correct by updating your site to be secure through a third-party SSL certificate.
TrafficWave is, again, not quite a traffic exchange. Rather, it’s a valuable tool to use with the traffic you’ve already attained. It’s a fairly sophisticated autoresponder for email lists, with a 30-day trial and a suite of tools designed to help you put together the best autoresponses available. Use it in conjunction with any of your affiliate or referral programs for a sizable benefit.
The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"):
Buffer App: This is a free app that you connect to your social media accounts. You can upgrade to a Pro account that gives you more features. You can configure the dates & times you need to post. Once your accounts are connected, you can select what you want to share on social media and click on Buffer. It’ll ask you which accounts you want to post to and you can customize the “message” you want to promote, by adding hashtags, images and a brief description. You can also install a Chrome extension that allows you to instantly “Buffer” any website post you’re on.
Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.
To do this, I often align the launch of my content with a couple of guest posts on relevant websites to drive a load of relevant traffic to it, as well as some relevant links. This has a knock-on effect toward the organic amplification of the content and means that you at least have something to show for the content (in terms of ROI) if it doesn't do as well as you expect organically.
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